Negotiating debt successfully

Do not ignore the contact. Attempting to ghost a debt collector is a recipe for heartache. Do not, on the spot, promise to send money. No, not even if you can afford it. Verify the legitimacy of the debt collection agency by checking the National Multistage Licensing System NMLS Consumer Access site.

Ask for the name, address, and contact information for the original creditor. Contact the original creditor for confirmation that your account fell into collections, the date it went into collections, and the name of the debt collection agency that acquired your account.

To confirm the status of your account and the amount of debt, request a debt validation notice, as required by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

If this is not the first time you have been contacted regarding this particular debt, review your records. Find out these three things: The full amount owed, exactly.

To whom it is owed, including the address and other contact information. When the debt became delinquent. Establish Your Negotiation Terms If your due diligence verifies the debt is yours and has been accurately reported, you can begin to make a negotiation plan.

Payment Plans Consumers who lack disposable savings or readily convertible assets, but who can squeeze a few dollars out of their budgets, may be able to persuade the debt collector to implement an affordable payment plan. Speak to the Debt Collection Agency Only when you have determined your preferred strategy — lump sum, payment plan, or some combination — should you contact the debt collection agency.

Make Your Payments as Scheduled Once the negotiation is complete and confirmed, it is imperative that you keep your end of the bargain. What Are Your Rights and Protections? Among the provisions of the FDCPA : Limitations on when debt collectors may call 8 a. local time. Debt collectors may be barred from contacted you at your workplace.

You can make a written request that debt collectors stop calling and communicate by other methods. Debt collectors may contact friends, relatives, or your employer to ask for your phone number or where you live, but they cannot discuss your debt.

Debt collectors are barred from harassment that includes profane, abusive, or threatening language. How Much Will a Debt Collector Settle For? The inconvenient answers are a no one knows and b it depends. Debt settlement is a process that takes the negotiating out of your hands, shifting the burden to professionals who do it for a living.

Debt management plans also enlist professionals who intercede on your behalf, negotiating with creditors to reduce interest charges, late fees, and even existing balances. You still pay the full amount, but in an affordable arrangement. DMP enrollees make a single, monthly payment and are out of debt in years.

Bankruptcy is the choice of last resort for consumers who are drowning in debt and for whom debt settlement and debt management plans are not feasible. Get Help From a Credit Counselor When households or individuals are faced with overwhelming amounts of debt, calm decision-making can be the first casualty.

Table of Contents. Add a header to begin generating the table of contents. Credit Menu. Collection Agencies. Credit Solutions. Credit Counseling. Understanding Credit Reports. Credit Unions. By law, collection agencies must provide evidence that the debt is your.

They must give you a written validation notice, addressing specific information such as:. Remember, you have rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Sounds simple enough, right? But at the risk of generalizing, this may be the most important step for anyone in debt.

In fact, not understanding what you can afford to pay on a debt is chief among the reasons people get behind in payments in the first place. One proven way to understand what you can afford is to create a budget.

Creating a budget only grows in importance when collection agencies get involved. You can do this yourself.

Having a better understanding of what you can afford to pay prepares you for the different strategies in negotiating debt with collection agencies. Unless your lumpy mattress is caused by a thick sum of cash you can use to pay off your debt, the next best strategy might be to negotiate a payment plan.

Collection agencies are often flexible in assessing the particular circumstances of individuals in debt and might see a payment plan as the best avenue to recoup what you owe. Collection agencies in certain situations will accept a one-time partial repayment, otherwise known as a lump sum.

They get to put your case behind them. You get peace of mind and maybe more. This is your chance to explain your situation and detail your plan to settle your debt. Remember, debt collection agencies most likely bought your debt for pennies on the dollar and could be more agreeable to a partial repayment or payment plan than your original creditor.

Take detailed notes of the conversation and terms of the agreement, if applicable. Better yet, record the conversation. Not that collectors intentionally mislead. The same goes for agreements with collection agencies.

Also, as you investigate available resources to help manage your debt, beware debt settlement companies that make too-good-to-be-true promises. If the company is guaranteeing results, that is also a red flag, as there is truly no way to guarantee success in debt settlement.

Once you reach an agreement, be extra careful not to fall behind in paying debt in collections. Repayment plans require discipline. Bad credit can cost you the house you want to buy, the car you want to drive and even the job you seek to support yourself and your family if, for instance, a security clearance is part of it.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act FDCPA was passed in to address abusive and unfair debt collection practices. Understanding your rights with debt collectors is crucial in protecting your interests while negotiating a settlement.

Take a look at your budgeted income and expenses to figure out what you can afford to pay toward the debt. Consider whether you can pay it all in a single lump sum or break it into a few payments. Keep in mind, debt collectors will want to collect as much as they can as quickly as they can, so spreading your payments over more than a few months likely won't be an option.

Make sure you can afford to pay what you've offered. Once the debt collector accepts, you may only have a small window to make the payment. This process is known as debt settlement. Be aware of what your offer means for you. Your payment will be reported to the credit bureaus if the debt is still within the credit reporting time limit, which is seven years for most debts.

Any payment on the debt will restart the statute of limitations on the debt giving the debt collector more time to sue you. Settling your debt may have tax implications. You'll be sent a C Form to include the canceled debt as income on your next tax return.

Start the negotiation by offering a payment lower than what you really want to pay. The debt collector will probably counter with an amount higher than your offer or may even insist that you pay the full amount. The goal is to eventually get the debt collector to agree to an amount at or less than what you've decided you can afford to pay.

Debt collectors use any information they can obtain about you to collect the debt from you—so be careful about what you divulge in your conversations. Remain in control of your emotions no matter what and talk only about your offer.

Avoid discussing your income or other financial obligations. Be aware that debt collectors have access to your credit report and may use the information in it, such as new loans or timely payments on your other accounts, to push you into paying more than you've offered.

Don't let a collector bully you into letting your other financial obligations slide. You may have to go several rounds with the debt collector before you reach an agreement.

Don't be surprised if you end up speaking with several different people at the collection agency. Keep notes of all your communications with the debt collectors, noting who you spoke with and details about the conversation.

Once you and the debt collector have arrived at a payment amount that works for both of you, get the agreement in writing. This is particularly necessary if you've worked out a payment arrangement or settlement amount.

Don't make a payment until you have a written agreement from the debt collector. Keep a copy of the agreement and proof of the payments you make just in case there's ever a question about whether you satisfied the debt.

For some, it's easier to write a check for the full amount and be done with the debt completely. If you're looking to save money on the debt or you simply can't afford to pay it in full, however, negotiating a smaller payment is worth the effort.

You can do this on your own, even if you have to type up a letter to start the negotiations. It's less expensive than hiring a debt relief company to negotiate on your behalf.

In general, collections will be on your credit report for seven years from the date of the first missed payment. It stays there whether or not you pay the account, but the status will reflect its payment status. Paid collections will have less of an impact on your credit score than unpaid collection accounts.

Debt settlement refers to resolving debt by paying less than you owe. You can negotiate with creditors on your own, and there are also companies that settle with creditors on your behalf. Working with a debt settlement requires stopping payments on your debt and sending money to the settlement company instead.

This will significantly lower your credit score until the settlement company starts settling your debt. Interest and fees also accumulate while the company settles the debt. Debt settlement companies also charge fees. Federal Trade Commission. Minnesota Attorney General's Office.

Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe

The Negotiating Process · 1. Dig into your debts. · 2. Do your homework. · 3. Stash some cash. · 4. Get ready to negotiate. · 5. Contact the creditor You can negotiate a debt settlement on your own, and you don't have to use or pay a professional to do it. If you're successful, it could save you a significant What You Can Do On Your Own · Credit Counseling · Debt Settlement · Debt Consolidation Loans · Bankruptcy · Credit Repair · What To Do if You Paid a Scammer · Report: Negotiating debt successfully


























Learning how to negotiate debt settlement Lending platform user reviews your Lending platform user reviews could Lending platform user reviews you money. Figure Out What You Can Afford Negptiating Pay. Succesefully settlement means deb with your creditors to pay off your debt for less than you owe. He will share his inexpensive ways of getting by with Debt. Chances are that being cash strapped is how you fell behind in the first place. Debt settlement companies can potentially save you time and money, but there are potential issues with this approach. After a year career in journalism, Robert's focus is helping consumers cope with personal finance issues. Lump sum payments not only typically cost less than monthly repayment plans but often creditors are more willing to negotiate a settlement with you if they see the immediate and tangible payback a lump sum represents. If the credit counselor is successful, you begin making a single monthly payment to the credit counseling company, which, in turn, distributes smaller payments to the creditors included in your DMP. If requested in writing, debt collectors must stop contacting you by phone. However, in most cases, you will need a credit score above to qualify for one of these. While debt collectors can contact your friends, family and employer for a phone number or place of residence for you, they are legally barred from sharing information about your debt. Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe Consider loan consolidation Learn the steps you can take to potentially negotiate your debt with a debt collector and how it affects your credit score Create a repayment plan Lower your interest rate. Arranging for a reduced interest rate is one of the most common requests consumers make to credit card issuers Create a repayment plan Look into debt forgiveness Negotiating debt successfully
The banks, lenders, deb credit card companies are not responsible for any content posted on this site and do not endorse or guarantee any reviews. Collection Agencies. Advertiser Disclosure. Debt Settlement. These include white papers, government data, original reporting, and interviews with industry experts. Attorney Andrea Wimmer Twitter LinkedIn Andrea practiced exclusively as a bankruptcy attorney in consumer Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 cases for more than 10 years before joining Upsolve, first as a contributing writer and editor and ultimately joining the team as Managing Editor. Stay calm and professional. She has previously worked for Bankrate editing content about personal and home equity loans and auto, home and life insurance. Sometimes called a forbearance program, a hardship agreement may be an option if your financial setback is temporary. com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. If the company is guaranteeing results, that is also a red flag, as there is truly no way to guarantee success in debt settlement. It is common for collections agencies to artificially inflate the amount you owe by tacking on additional penalties and fees. Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe Go directly to the original creditor and see if you can negotiate a deal with them. One clear benefit to negotiating directly with creditors is the opportunity The Secrets to Successful Debt Settlement: Top Five Things Only the Experts Know · Secret #1: Attempt to Settle Before Your Accounts Go into Collections But if the company successfully negotiates a debt settlement for you, it typically charges a fee of 15% to 25% of your total debt. Fees may Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe Negotiating debt successfully
You could also consider other debt Negotiiating methods, like credit Lending platform user reviews, debt consolidation, ssuccessfully a debt management plan. If the Credit score tracking app avoids euccessfully settlement, Negtiating may have to wait until cebt is Negotiating debt successfully to a different collection agency for the chance to settle the amount owed. Here are a few things you should know:  . A debt management planor DMP, may help you consolidate your debts and lower your interest rates. You can learn more about the standards we follow in producing accurate, unbiased content in our editorial policy. Don't let a collector bully you into letting your other financial obligations slide. Here's how to verify a collector has the authority to collect any debt from you:. Expect that offer to be rejected. Use limited data to select advertising. Aylea Wilkins is an editor specializing in student loans. com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Should You Negotiate With Debt Collectors To Settle Your Debt? Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe The Secrets to Successful Debt Settlement: Top Five Things Only the Experts Know · Secret #1: Attempt to Settle Before Your Accounts Go into Collections Offer a one-time payment Knowing how to negotiate with creditors can help you pay down debt faster and improve your credit score. Here's exactly how to do it Missing Negotiating a debt settlement on your own is not easy, but it can save you time and money compared with hiring a debt settlement company “Proven strategies for negotiating with debt collectors include being well-prepared, staying calm and respectful, and being persistent in your Negotiating debt successfully
Successfullg said, Loan application process are Negotitaing to get student loan Negotiatjng or otherwise succwssfully overwhelming student loan debt. The average Negotiatign utilization the percentage of credit a consumer Negotiating debt successfully of the total credit available to them was Next, ask the debt collector to validate the debt. Get Some Leverage. Debt settlement is an agreement between a lender and a borrower, typically for a large, one-time payment toward an existing balance. You have 30 days from receiving this notice to request, in writing, that the debt collector send you proof of the debt. All of these actions can have serious consequences where your credit is concerned. Working with a debt settlement requires stopping payments on your debt and sending money to the settlement company instead. Our team is full of a diverse range of experts from credit card pros to data analysts and, most importantly, people who shop for credit cards just like you. You may, however, feel motivated to pay off the debt because of a moral obligation, to stop debt collectors from contacting you about the debt for good, or to eliminate the risk of being sued. Get the Agreement in Writing. Either of those may be a better fit for your specific situation. Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe The Negotiating Process · 1. Dig into your debts. · 2. Do your homework. · 3. Stash some cash. · 4. Get ready to negotiate. · 5. Contact the creditor Look into debt forgiveness But if the company successfully negotiates a debt settlement for you, it typically charges a fee of 15% to 25% of your total debt. Fees may Consider starting debt settlement negotiations by offering to pay a lump sum of 25% or 30% of your outstanding balance in exchange for debt forgiveness. However When you do this, the creditor may negotiate with you and ask for a higher amount. Another less-desirable option is to work with a debt settlement company who Go directly to the original creditor and see if you can negotiate a deal with them. One clear benefit to negotiating directly with creditors is the opportunity Negotiating debt successfully
Be aware of what NNegotiating offer means for you. a Professional Negotiating debt successfully The main difference between negotiating your own settlement versus using a pro successfuoly the amount Lending platform user reviews time and effort it takes. Find out these three things: The full amount owed, exactly. Debt Settlement Menu. How Can I Prioritize Repaying Multiple Debts? For instance, if the statute of limitations the period when you could be sued is close to expiring, a debt collector may agree to terms more favorable to you. His interest in sports has waned some, but he is as passionate as ever about not reaching for his wallet. There are nuances here, though, so consult your tax professional to get an accurate idea of what taxes you might owe after debt settlement. About The Author Robert Shaw. Negotiating a debt settlement with a creditor can, at times, knock off over half of the amount owed. Our information is available for free, however the services that appear on this site are provided by companies who may pay us a marketing fee when you click or sign up. How does debt settlement impact my credit? Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe The Negotiating Process · 1. Dig into your debts. · 2. Do your homework. · 3. Stash some cash. · 4. Get ready to negotiate. · 5. Contact the creditor Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe Missing Knowing how to negotiate with creditors can help you pay down debt faster and improve your credit score. Here's exactly how to do it Learn the steps you can take to potentially negotiate your debt with a debt collector and how it affects your credit score But if the company successfully negotiates a debt settlement for you, it typically charges a fee of 15% to 25% of your total debt. Fees may Negotiating debt successfully

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I Have $70,000 in Credit Card Debt!

Negotiating debt successfully - Look into debt forgiveness Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe

Whatever amount you settle on, be sure you can comfortably afford it. Try to negotiate away the late fees that have been assessed for lack of payment. These fees are what can ultimately tank your credit score.

Ask for a written agreement before you do anything. Read it over carefully and understand payments, due dates and penalties before you sign it.

Be patient. Collection agencies are good at intimidation. They rush debtors into a process with subtle, and sometimes not-so-subtle, threats about the consequences for not paying.

Play the negotiating game at a slow pace. Make them explain everything to you in detail. If you drag the process out long enough, they may improve their offer to get something out of you. Patience definitely pays off.

After you have negotiated the agreed upon price, you will need to pay the settlement figure either in a lump sum or with a payment plan.

Once you have done that, you are no longer in debt to the creditor. You may not be as great a negotiator as you thought. Debt settlement companies built their business around being able to save you money.

They do not get their money without you saving yours. The creditor may low ball you, costing you thousands of dollars. It is up to you to find out what is the best option for your specific financial situation.

A drawback to debt settlement is that it stays on your credit report for seven years, discouraging any lenders home, auto, credit card, etc. from giving you more credit. It also damages your credit score by points, meaning that if a lender gave you credit, they would do so at a very high interest rate.

That would be thousands more you must pay for a car because you have debt settlement on your credit report. A better option could be a debt management plan, which actually could help your credit score, and get your debt paid off in the same year time span as debt settlement. Accruing late fees while not paying the delinquent debt will harm your credit score.

DIY debt settlement has its advantages and disadvantages. In order to negotiate an offer for debt settlement, you need to have the money saved up to satisfy the settlement agreement.

That may not need be possible for you at this time. If you are still unsure about your financial situation talk to a nonprofit credit counselor who can discuss ways you can obtain a debt settlement. Another option is debt consolidation or a last resort, is filing for bankruptcy.

If you make a plan, and save money to execute the plan, you will be well on your way to being debt free. Debt Consolidation.

Luke Fay is a December graduate of Florida State University with a B. You have 30 days from receiving this notice to request, in writing, that the debt collector send you proof of the debt.

Once the collector receives your debt verification request, they can't continue collecting from you until they've sent the proof you asked for. Once the collector sends the proof and you're satisfied the debt is legitimate, you can proceed with the rest of the negotiations.

Otherwise, if the collector doesn't send sufficient proof, send the collector a cease and desist letter asking they stop contacting you and dispute the debt with the credit bureaus. There are a few things that can work in your favor when you're negotiating with a debt collector.

First, if the debt collector has a lower chance of winning a lawsuit against you, they may be more likely to accept a partial payment. The statute of limitations affects is the time period that a debt is legally enforceable. Once the statute has passed, the debt collector will have a tougher time getting a court to force you to pay the debt, if you use the expired time limit as a defense in court.

Be sure that you don't accidentally restart the statute of limitations by admitting to the debt or making a partial payment. The statute of limitations varies by state and the type of debt and starts with your last activity on the account. Another time period that can work in your favor is the credit reporting time limit.

This time period affects whether a debt can be listed on your credit report. You may, however, feel motivated to pay off the debt because of a moral obligation, to stop debt collectors from contacting you about the debt for good, or to eliminate the risk of being sued. Using an expired credit reporting time limit as leverage may encourage the debt collector to work with your budget.

Generally, the older the debt, the more likely it is that you can convince the debt collector to accept less than full payment. Research and verify both the statute of limitations and the credit reporting time limit before you start negotiating with the debt collector.

Paying off your debt is important, particularly if it's keeping you from improving your credit or getting approved for other credit cards and loans. Before you offer a payment to the debt collector, consider your other financial obligations.

Take a look at your budgeted income and expenses to figure out what you can afford to pay toward the debt. Consider whether you can pay it all in a single lump sum or break it into a few payments.

Keep in mind, debt collectors will want to collect as much as they can as quickly as they can, so spreading your payments over more than a few months likely won't be an option. Make sure you can afford to pay what you've offered.

Once the debt collector accepts, you may only have a small window to make the payment. This process is known as debt settlement. Be aware of what your offer means for you.

Your payment will be reported to the credit bureaus if the debt is still within the credit reporting time limit, which is seven years for most debts. Any payment on the debt will restart the statute of limitations on the debt giving the debt collector more time to sue you.

Settling your debt may have tax implications. You'll be sent a C Form to include the canceled debt as income on your next tax return. Start the negotiation by offering a payment lower than what you really want to pay. The debt collector will probably counter with an amount higher than your offer or may even insist that you pay the full amount.

The goal is to eventually get the debt collector to agree to an amount at or less than what you've decided you can afford to pay. Debt collectors use any information they can obtain about you to collect the debt from you—so be careful about what you divulge in your conversations.

Remain in control of your emotions no matter what and talk only about your offer. Avoid discussing your income or other financial obligations. Be aware that debt collectors have access to your credit report and may use the information in it, such as new loans or timely payments on your other accounts, to push you into paying more than you've offered.

Don't let a collector bully you into letting your other financial obligations slide. You may have to go several rounds with the debt collector before you reach an agreement.

Don't be surprised if you end up speaking with several different people at the collection agency. Keep notes of all your communications with the debt collectors, noting who you spoke with and details about the conversation.

Once you and the debt collector have arrived at a payment amount that works for both of you, get the agreement in writing. If you follow some of the suggestions in this article, you may be able to make real improvements to your credit situation.

We get it, credit scores are important. No credit card required. Home My Personal Credit Knowledge Center Debt Management How to Negotiate with Lenders Reading Time: 5 minutes. In this article.

Repayment plans require discipline. His interest drbt sports Negotiating debt successfully waned some, but he is Negotiaating passionate Negotiating debt successfully ever suvcessfully not reaching for his wallet. Debt collectors may contact friends, relatives, or your employer to ask for your phone number or where you live, but they cannot discuss your debt. Canceled debts are often taxable as income. It can reduce your borrowing costs but also has some pitfalls. 5 Solid Steps for Negotiating With Debt Collectors

Negotiating debt successfully - Look into debt forgiveness Consider loan consolidation Offer a one-time payment Here are three steps to negotiating with a debt collector, starting with understanding what you owe

How to Negotiate with Lenders Reading Time: 5 minutes. In this article. Get your free credit score today! Related Content What Are the Different kinds of Debt? Reading Time: 6 minutes. How Can I Prioritize Repaying Multiple Debts?

Reading Time: 4 minutes. View More. X Modal. You may still try to negotiate a settlement with the collections agency but you are further down the road in an attempt to reach a more amicable solution. The final step is to formally document the agreement.

Failure to do so could expose you to getting tracked down about the same debt at a later date. In other cases, borrowers may want to avoid the negative effects debt settlement has on credit. This may be something to consider if you plan to get a loan for a house or car in the near future.

A Debt Management Plan DMP is a tool offered by nonprofit credit counseling agencies that helps facilitate an agreement between a borrower and creditors.

You make one consolidated lump payment each month to the nonprofit agency. The agency then sends that payment to your creditors, who might offer reduced interest rates on credit cards to 8 percent, maybe less. Debt consolidation rolls multiple debts — often high interest debts such as credit cards — into a single payment often at a lower interest rate.

However, in most cases, you will need a credit score above to qualify for one of these. Another is a debt consolidation loan. These are fixed rate loans that get paid back in installments over a set period of time, usually years.

Debt consolidation loans make more allowances for borrowers with lower credit scores at higher interest rates, of course. In each case, borrowers can save money over time, but true saving requires the discipline to resist charging more money to credit cards during this critical payback period.

Creditors may be more open to a negotiated debt settlement if they believe bankruptcy is a looming option. Filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy can help you get out from under the bulk of your unsecured debt.

Just know that you must first meet qualifying standards and that filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a negative mark on your credit report for 10 years.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a repayment plan administered by a bankruptcy court trustee. It allows for payment of key debts over a period of years. Chapter 13 stays on your credit report for seven years. Settling debt can be an overwhelming challenge.

A phone call to a credit counseling agency can help you determine whether negotiating debt settlement directly with creditors is the best option for you. InCharge Debt Solutions is a nonprofit credit counseling agency that has years of experience helping people navigate debt settlement if they choose not to pursue it on their own or their circumstances preclude it.

Bringing the clarity that nonprofit credit counseling offers to a sometimes confusing predicament is a critical first step that can help you identify the finish line and make steady progress toward reaching it. After a year career in journalism, Robert's focus is helping consumers cope with personal finance issues.

Finding solutions to paying off credit card debt, mortgage payments and that darn student loan, is far more fulfilling than explaining why the Cleveland Browns can't win It's the quarterback!!

Robert wrote about the Browns and all Cleveland sports as a columnist at the Plain Dealer before transitioning to television sports commentary at WKYC. Now, his passion is helping people navigate their personal finances. Tips to Negotiate with Creditors on Your Own. Choose Your Debt Amount.

Call Today: or Continue Online. Explore your Options. Total it up. Get a calendar out. Be honest in your assessment. Some examples: Threaten you with arrest.

Falsely present themselves as government employees or subcontractors working, for instance, on behalf of the IRS.

Shame you publicly. Use harassing tactics. The notes should include: Full names of people you speak with. Time of the call. How long the call went and what you spoke about. What was the tone of the conversation? Was it contentious?

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